Why Bamboo?

Occasionally, a new development comes along that provides some optimism about our prospects for making positive changes in our living habits.

One such development is the emergence of new uses for a species of grass that has been around far longer than we have:

Bamboo!

Bamboo has been used for everything from food to bridge building for millennia but consumers and manufacturers are taking a fresh look at all that this amazing plant has to offer.

By now, nearly everyone knows that we are depleting the natural resources of the only home that we have at a rate that is well past sustainable. To some extent, we have become inured to alarming reports and ominous warnings about our wasteful ways.

Media outlets yammer away about Overpopulation, Global Warming and Deforestation and these reports either fatigue or motivate us to make necessary changes in our lives.

Reasons Why Bamboo Can Help Us Protect Our Environment

1.

Helps retain water in the watershed

3.

Needs no replanting after harvesting

5.

Reduces runoff, prevents massive soil erosion

7.

Protects surrounding environment during typhoons due to its height.regenerates and is resilient even after strong typhoons

9.

Requires little attention during its growing/production cycle

2.

Can be harvested annually

4.

Is an effective erosion control plant and natural control barrier due to its widespread root system and large canopy

6.

Sustains riverbanks

8.

Helps mitigate water pollution due to its high nitrogen consumption

10.

Is well suited for agro forestry and healthy ecosystems

Requires only a modest capital investment to generate a steady income.

11.

Benefits of Bamboo

Renewable Resource

Depending on the species, bamboo can be harvested in one to five years versus 10-50 years for most softwoods and hardwoods. Thereafter harvests are possible every second year for up to one hundred and twenty years the yield (weight per acreage and year) is up to 25 times higher than that of timber Hardwoods like oak take at least forty years to mature before they can be harvested.

 

Almost 1 million acres of forests are lost each week worldwide to deforestation. Bamboo’s versatility as a substitute for hardwoods offers a chance to drastically reduce that figure and protect the forests that we have left.

Very Little Waste

After harvesting, virtually every part of the plant is used to make a wide variety of products. From soil-enriching mulch to beautiful furniture to chopsticks, every part of the plant can be utilized.

Absorbs Greenhouse Gases

Bamboo absorbs carbon dioxide and releases 35% more oxygen into the atmosphere than an equivalent stand of hardwood trees.

Bamboo Grows in a Variety of Conditions

Bamboo can grow in arid regions where droughts cause other crops to fail and since the roots are left in place after harvesting, it helps to preserve vital moisture in the soil. From low wetlands to higher elevations in the mountains, bamboo thrives in a wide range of climates.

Versatility

Bamboo can replace the use of wood for nearly every application. Paper, flooring, furniture, charcoal, building materials and much more can be made from bamboo. What’s more, bamboo fibers are far stronger than wood fibers and much less likely to warp from changing atmospheric conditions. No fertilizer, pesticides, or herbicides needed. Unlike most cash crops, bamboo requires no agricultural chemicals to thrive. Unlike cotton, which is one of the most intensely sprayed crops in the world and rapidly depletes the nutrients in the soil, bamboo sequesters nitrogen and cultivation does not add chemicals to the environment.

Soil Protection

Once hardwood forests are clear-cut and the stumps are burned to provide fertilizer and space for growing crops, erosion inevitably occurs as the topsoil and nutrients are washed away by rainfall. The eroded soil then clogs rivers and streams and affects the lives of people and animals living downstream. Bamboo roots remain in place after harvesting where they prevent erosion and help retain nutrients for the next crop.

Economic Development

In less developed countries where unemployment leads to civil unrest, bamboo production and the manufacturing of bamboo products provides job opportunities in areas that desperately need social and economic stability. The market potential of bamboo is estimated to be 26000 crores by 2015 and if tapped in a proper way bamboo can help more than 5 million of our population cross the poverty line.

Optimism and Cultural Cooperation

Bamboo can replace the use of wood for nearly every application. Paper, flooring, furniture, charcoal, building materials and much more can be made from bamboo. What’s more, bamboo fibers are far stronger than wood fibers and much less likely to warp from changing atmospheric conditions. No fertilizer, pesticides, or herbicides needed. Unlike most cash crops, bamboo requires no agricultural chemicals to thrive. Unlike cotton, which is one of the most intensely sprayed crops in the world and rapidly depletes the nutrients in the soil, bamboo sequesters nitrogen and cultivation does not add chemicals to the environment.

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